Detained American Provides Glimpse Into Chinese Forced Labor Practices
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Detained American Provides Glimpse Into Chinese Forced Labor Practices

Detained American Provides Glimpse Into Chinese Forced Labor Practices

Yang Chen

April 24, 2014

— An American Fulbright Scholar who was arrested in China for stealing spent eight months assembling Christmas lights in a detention center.

Stuart Foster lives in Spartanburg, South Carolina. Life there is quiet and comfortable.

It’s hard to imagine that just months ago, he was working six days a week, more than eight hours a day, assembling Christmas lights in the Baiyun Detention Center in Guangzhou, China.

“At about 9:30 or 10 [in the morning], it varied, they would bring in work in big bags, industrial plastics bags,” said Foster. “And it would be in the outer cells, the bosses would count and see how much it was, and then call for the inmates on the inside to come get their portions.”

He said the guards told him the lights are exported to the U.S. and other Western countries.

The Fulbright Scholar was detained for stealing money from a fellow American teacher at the Guangdong University of Foreign Studies.

Foster admitted the theft and returned the money. After eight months in detention, however, he was convicted and sentenced to time served. He was deported from China last December.

Foster said he was forced to work even though China claims to be closing labor camps. “Now when you look at the news, there will be reports, ‘well, they are closing the reeducation through labor’ or ‘they are turning many of these into drug rehabilitation centers.’ But where I was, if you don’t work, you were beaten. If you don’t work, they take your food. If you don’t work, you will not have your case heard. It was at every turn physical punishment if you didn’t work. If that’s not forced labor, what is?”

via Detained American Provides Glimpse Into Chinese Forced Labor Practices.

Photo by The U.S. National Archives

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