Nanoparticles: The Tiniest Toxin
Home » Disaster » Human Diseases » Nanoparticles: The Tiniest Toxin

Nanoparticles: The Tiniest Toxin

Nanoparticles: The Tiniest Toxin

by: Daisy Luther | on May 2, 2013

If we didn’t have enough to worry about in the grocery aisles, with GMOs, toxic additives, and pesticide-soaked foods, we can now add a new concern:  nanoparticles.

What exactly is a nanoparticle?   As You Sow, a non-profit consumer advocacy group, explains:

Nanomaterials are often heralded as having the potential to revolutionize the food industry – from enabling the production of creamy liquids that contain no fat, to enhancing flavors,improving supplement delivery, providing brighter colors, keeping food fresh longer, or indicating when it spoils. It is reported that nanotechnology is already used in food and food related products, but due to lack of transparency about the issue, concrete information has been difficult to obtain.

Because of their small size, nanoparticles are able to go places in the body that larger particles cannot.  Nanoparticles in food or food packaging can gain access via ingestion, inhalation,or skin penetration. When ingested, the nano-sized particles facilitate uptake into cells and can allow them to pass into the blood and lymph where they circulate through the body and reach potentially sensitive target sites such as bone marrow, lymph nodes, the spleen, the brain, the liver, and the heart. Nanoparticles penetrating the skin can distribute through the body via lymphatic channels.  Inhaled nano TiO2 has been found to act like asbestos and silicone in that it accumulates in the lung and causes inflammation and can impact DNA proteins and cell membranes. (download the entire report on nanoparticles HERE)

So, much like GMOs, nanoparticle technology was not properly tested before it entered our food supply.

The few studies that have been done have alarming results.

A Swedish study, Influence of Nanoparticles on Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability and Brain Edema Formation in Rats, revealed that nanoparticles derived from transition metals, silver, copper, aluminum, silicon, carbon and metal oxides easily crossed the blood-brain barrier and produced lasting damage to the barrier, by altering the permeability.

Research at Cornell University, led by Dr. Michael Shuler, studied how large doses of polystyrene nanoparticles – a common, FDA-approved substance found in substances ranging from food additives to vitamins – affected the absorption of iron:

 

Continue reading at Nanoparticles: The Tiniest Toxin |.

Be Sociable, Share!

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

http://ad4.liverail.com/?LR_PUBLISHER_ID=26258&LR_SCHEMA=vast2-vpaid&LR_VERTICAL=preroll&LR_URL=[page_url_macro]&LR_AUTOPLAY=0&LR_CONTENT=6&LR_MUTED=0&LR_VIDEO_ID=[player_videoid_macro]&LR_TITLE=[video_title_macro]