Study: You Can Get PTSD From News Coverage of Terror Attacks
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Study: You Can Get PTSD From News Coverage of Terror Attacks

Study: You Can Get PTSD From News Coverage of Terror Attacks

Susanne Posel
Occupy Corporatism
December 10, 2013

Researchers at the University of California at Irvine have found that media coverage of a terrorist attack is just as powerful an effect on the human psyche as being at the event itself.

English: Cases of PTSD and Severe Depression A...

English: Cases of PTSD and Severe Depression Among U.S. Veterans Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan Between Oct 2001 and Oct 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The team at UC Irvine observed that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) could be developed within an individual’s mind from simply watching media coverage on a terroristic event.

The study entitled, “Media’s Role in Broadcasting Acute Stress Following the Boston Marathon Bombings”, claims that “media coverage of collective traumas may trigger psychological distress in individuals outside the directly affected community.”

Findings concluded that “repeated bombing-related media exposure was associated with higher acute stress than as with direct exposure. Media coverage following a collective trauma can raise the severity of the stress.

This unique study compares the impact of direct vs. indirect media-based community trauma exposure on acute stress responses.”

Roxane Cohen, co-author of the study cautions Americans against being “repeatedly exposed throughout the day to a variety of sources of media.”

This internet-based survey polled 5,000 Americans in the 2 to 4 weeks after the Boston Marathon Bombing (BMB).

Of those participants, 1% was at the event; 9% knew someone close to them who attended the event; another 9% were directly affected by the event.

Whether participants were exposed to the BMB by television broadcasts, radio news or internet, it became clear to researchers that there was an acute rise in stress that was palatable for both those who learned about the event and those who were there.

It was surmised that if a person consumed more than 6 hours of news about the BMB or bombing-related news coverage, that person was 9 times more likely to have symptoms of high acute stress (HAS).

HAS is a patented psychological disease with symptoms such as:

• Anxiety
• Low mood
• Irritability
• Emotional ups and downs
• Poor sleep
• Poor concentration
• Wanting to be alone
• Palpitations
• Feeling sick
• Chest pain
• Headaches
• Abdominal pains
• Breathing difficulties

Respondents said that they “try to avoid thoughts” about the BMB, felt “hypervigilant” or “on edge” and reported symptoms under predetermined criteria of:

• Disassociation
• Avoidance
• Re-experiencing
• Arousal/anxiety

Five percent of the participants reported those symptoms.

– See more at: http://www.occupycorporatism.com/study-can-get-ptsd-news-coverage-terror-attacks/#sthash.XSfAeEGU.dpuf

Researchers at the University of California at Irvine have found that media coverage of a terrorist attack is just as powerful an effect on the human psyche as being at the event itself.

The team at UC Irvine observed that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) could be developed within an individual’s mind from simply watching media coverage on a terroristic event.

The study entitled, “Media’s Role in Broadcasting Acute Stress Following the Boston Marathon Bombings”, claims that “media coverage of collective traumas may trigger psychological distress in individuals outside the directly affected community.”

Findings concluded that “repeated bombing-related media exposure was associated with higher acute stress than as with direct exposure. Media coverage following a collective trauma can raise the severity of the stress.

This unique study compares the impact of direct vs. indirect media-based community trauma exposure on acute stress responses.”

Roxane Cohen, co-author of the study cautions Americans against being “repeatedly exposed throughout the day to a variety of sources of media.”

This internet-based survey polled 5,000 Americans in the 2 to 4 weeks after the Boston Marathon Bombing (BMB).

Of those participants, 1% was at the event; 9% knew someone close to them who attended the event; another 9% were directly affected by the event.

Whether participants were exposed to the BMB by television broadcasts, radio news or internet, it became clear to researchers that there was an acute rise in stress that was palatable for both those who learned about the event and those who were there.

It was surmised that if a person consumed more than 6 hours of news about the BMB or bombing-related news coverage, that person was 9 times more likely to have symptoms of high acute stress (HAS).

HAS is a patented psychological disease with symptoms such as:

• Anxiety
• Low mood
• Irritability
• Emotional ups and downs
• Poor sleep
• Poor concentration
• Wanting to be alone
• Palpitations
• Feeling sick
• Chest pain
• Headaches
• Abdominal pains
• Breathing difficulties

Respondents said that they “try to avoid thoughts” about the BMB, felt “hypervigilant” or “on edge” and reported symptoms under predetermined criteria of:

• Disassociation
• Avoidance
• Re-experiencing
• Arousal/anxiety

Five percent of the participants reported those symptoms.

– See more at: http://www.occupycorporatism.com/study-can-get-ptsd-news-coverage-terror-attacks/#sthash.XSfAeEGU.dpuf

Continue reading at Study: You Can Get PTSD From News Coverage of Terror Attacks – Susanne Posel | Susanne Posel.

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